PhD student

Eren Gunseli

PhD student

E-mail: e.gunseli@vu.nl
Phone: +31 (0) 20 598 7149
Room: 1E-01

Personal webpage

Projects

PhD project is about the effects of repeatedly performing a visual search on visual working memory representation of the search target (i.e. the template), and its consequent effects on visual attention. I also have research projects regarding the role of attention on visual working memory representations using retro-cues. My project is funded by NWO and supervised by Dr. Martijn Meeter, and Dr. Chris Olivers.

Biography

I studied Physics (BA) and Cognitive Psychology (MA) at Bogazici University, Istanbul. During my MA, I worked as a Laboratory Assistant in Cognitive Processes Lab at Bogazici University. For my thesis, I worked on a project with Aysecan Boduroglu regarding the effects of selective attention on the working memory maintenance of features and bindings. In 2011, I started my PhD at VU University Amsterdam. I conducted EEG and behavioral experiments on healthy human participants. I have some ongoing projects regarding (1) the effects of target repetition on involuntary guidance of selective attention by working memory representations, (2) the effects of reliability of probabilistic retro-cues on working memory representations, and (3) the effects of context changes on the updating of working memory representations. All projects are supervised by Dr. Martijn Meeter and Dr. Chris Olivers. The second project is in collaboration with Msc. Dirk van Moorselaar and Dr. Johannes Fahrenfort. The third project is in collaboration with Dr.Tobias Egner and will be conducted in Duke University. I use EEG and eye movement recordings together with behavioral data. The project with Dr. Tobias Egner will involve fMRI recordings.

Research interests

How are we able to find our car among other cars in a parking lot, or to drive without crashing into other cars on the highway? These simple daily tasks require visual selective attention and visual memory mechanisms. My research interest is the investigation of these mechanisms and their interaction. For this, we test healthy volunteers in computer tasks and explore the factors that affect these mechanisms, such as the context, practice, task demands and strategies. We use eye tracking, electrophysiological recordings and brain imaging to investigate behavioral and neural underpinnings of visual attention and memory.

Links

ResearchGate
Google scholar

Recent publications

E Gunseli, J Foster, D Sutterer, E Vogel & E Awh (2017) Alpha-Band Activity Tracks Updates to the Content of Spatial Working Memory. Journal of Vision 17 (10), 337-337
N Hakim, K Adam, E Gunseli & E Vogel (2017) Sustained spatial attention is not sufficient to elicit the Contralateral Delay Activity. Journal of Vision 17 (10), 862-862
J van Driel, E Gunseli, M Meeter & CNL Olivers (2017) Local and interregional alpha EEG dynamics dissociate between memory for search and memory for recognition. NeuroImage 149, 114-128
EW Dowd, E Gunseli, M Meeter, C Olivers & T Egner (2016) Changes in task-irrelevant context invoke updating of task-relevant representations in working memory. Journal of Vision 16 (12), 351-351
E Gunseli, CNL Olivers & M Meeter (2016) Task-irrelevant memories rapidly gain attentional control with learning.. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 42 (3), 354
E Gunseli (2016) Interactions between Attention and Working Memory: Effects of Learning and Task Demands. Amsterdam: Vrije Universiteit
E Gunseli, D van Moorselaar, M Meeter & CNL Olivers (2015) The reliability of retro-cues determines the fate of noncued visual working memory representations. Psychonomic bulletin & review 22 (5), 1334-1341
D van Moorselaar, E Gunseli, J Theeuwes & C NL Olivers (2015) The time course of protecting a visual memory representation from perceptual interference. Frontiers in human neuroscience 8, 1053
E Gunseli, CNL Olivers & M Meeter (2014) Effects of search difficulty on the selection, maintenance, and learning of attentional templates. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 26 (9), 2042-2054
E Gunseli, M Meeter & CNL Olivers (2014) Is a search template an ordinary working memory? Comparing electrophysiological markers of working memory maintenance for visual search and recognition. Neuropsychologia 60, 29-38
E Günseli, CNL Olivers & M Meeter (2014) Learning a template makes irrelevant working memory representations guide attention.
E Günseli, M Meeter & CNL Olivers (2014) Effects of search difficulty on the selection, maintenance, and learning of the attentional template. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 2042-2054
E Günseli, CNL Olivers & M Meeter (2013) Learning to attend in easy and difficult visual displays.
E Günseli, CNL Olivers & M Meeter (2012) Visual search templates: Working memory or longterm memory representations.

View full list of publications on Google Scholar