PhD student

Ingmar de Vries

PhD student

E-mail: i.e.j.de.vries@vu.nl
Room: 1E-01

Projects

I am working on the ERC-project “The Template 2.0: Depicting the picture in your head” together with my promotor Chris Olivers and my co-promotor Joram van Driel. Also involved in this project are Katya Olmos and Anouk van Loon. Not on the same project but together with us on the same topic are Eduard Ort and Johannes Fahrenfort.

Biography

My name is Ingmar de Vries and I was born in Nijmegen and raised in Den Haag. I completed both the Bachelor and the Research Master in Human Movement Sciences at the VU University in Amsterdam. In my Research Masters Internship I studied bimanual muscle synergies under supervision of Tjeerd Boonstra and Andreas Daffertshofer. I investigated how bilateral coordination in small precision hand movements is organized in the nervous system. For this I measured cortical activity (EEG) and muscle activity (high density surface EMG) in a bimanual coordination task and studied functional connectivity between muscle activity and contralateral motor cortex and between muscle activity in homologous left and right hand muscles.

Research interest

Although my background is quite different than most of my colleagues in the department of cognitive psychology, my interest in human behaviour has always been broad (e.g. motor control, cognition, perception, etc.). During my Research Master I got interested in neurosciences and realized that this interest is not so much in motor control as in more cognitive aspects of neuroscience. I decided I wanted to develop my knowledge and experience in the cognitive side of neuroscience and try to understand how complex human cognition can be understood in terms of its underlying neural mechanisms. Specifically I am interested in understanding how these neural mechanisms can bring about a “top-down” influence on our perception when we search for something in the world. That is, what are the neural mechanisms underlying the visual search template that we use to guide our attention when looking for something in the world (e.g. finding your friend in a large crowd of people).